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Aurora that appears to be casting rays of green sunlight through the clouds.  Image courtesy of Hugo Løhre

Doesn’t it look like this aurora is shining green rays of light through the clouds? Image courtesy of Hugo Løhre via NASA.

This image of the northern polar region of Saturn shows both the aurora and underlying atmosphere, seen at two different wavelengths of infrared light as captured by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.  Credit:NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Earth isn’t the only planet that has auroras. In this image of the northern region of Saturn, aurora can be seen using two different wavelengths of infrared light. The image was captured by the Cassini spacecraft. Credit:NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

This is a spectacular NASA Hubble Space Telescope close-up view of an electric-blue aurora that is eerily glowing one half billion miles away on the giant planet Jupiter. Credit: NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team

We can’t forget Jupiter. Here’s a “spectacular NASA Hubble Space Telescope close-up view of an electric-blue aurora that is eerily glowing one half billion miles away on the giant planet Jupiter.” The description was too good. Photo and caption courtesy of NASA and the Hubble Heritage Team

A sky watcher from Marquette, Michigan sent this picture, taken before sunrise on April 12, 2011. Image Courtesy of Shane Malone.

An aurora in Michigan taken before sunrise in 2011. Image courtesy of Shane Malone via NASA.

An aurora in Whitehorse Yukon Canada that appeared in the sky in the early hours of Oct. 1, 2012 due to the effects of a coronal mass ejection (CME) that erupted from the sun three days earlier. Image Courtesy of Joseph Bradley

An aurora in Canada that appeared 2012. Image courtesy of Joseph Bradley via NASA.

This false-color composite image, constructed from data obtained by NASA's Cassini spacecraft, shows the glow of auroras streaking out about 1,000 kilometers (600 miles) from the cloud tops of Saturn's south polar region.  Image credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/University of Leicester

This false-color composite image, constructed from data obtained by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, shows the glow of auroras streaking out about 600 miles from the cloud tops of Saturn’s south polar region. Image and caption courtesy of NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/University of Leicester

Flying at an altitude of about 240 miles over the eastern North Atlantic, the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station photographed this nighttime scene. This view looks northeastward. Center point coordinates are 46.8 degrees north latitude and 14.3 degrees west longitude. The night lights of the cities of Ireland, in the foreground, and the United Kingdom, in the back and to the right, are contrasted by the bright sunrise in the background. The greens and purples of the Aurora Borealis are seen along the rest of the horizon. This image was taken on March 28, 2012. Image Credit: NASA

Flying at an altitude of about 240 miles over the eastern North Atlantic, the Expedition 30 crew aboard the International Space Station photographed this nighttime scene. This view looks northeastward. Center point coordinates are 46.8 degrees north latitude and 14.3 degrees west longitude. The night lights of the cities of Ireland, in the foreground, and the United Kingdom, in the back and to the right, are contrasted by the bright sunrise in the background. The greens and purples of the Aurora Borealis are seen along the rest of the horizon. This image was taken in March 2012. Image and caption courtesy of NASA

The Expedition 32 crew onboard the International Space Station, flying an altitude of approximately 240 miles, recorded a series of images of Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, on July 15, 2012.

The Expedition 32 crew on board the International Space Station, flying an altitude of approximately 240 miles, recorded a series of images of Aurora Australis, also known as the Southern Lights, in July 2012. Image and caption courtesy of NASA

orthern Lights to ripple over the US-Canadian border. This aurora impact image was provided from a sky watcher in Canada. Credit: NASA/Zoltan Kenwell

Northern Lights ripple over the US-Canadian border. Image courtesy of  NASA/Zoltan Kenwell

 This photo was taken five miles outside Kearney, Nebraska. Image courtesy of Mark Urwiller.

This photo was taken in Nebraska. Image courtesy of Mark Urwiller and NASA.

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